Posts

Is it just me or does your inner self ever ask questions like this?

“But I thought as a Christian, I wouldn’t have any problems…?”

“Why am I still struggling? Shouldn’t faith eliminate the struggle?”

“I thought Jesus would get rid of my problems. Is there something wrong with me?”

Maybe you don’t literally ask yourself those questions. But maybe it silently nags at you from time to time. Maybe you, like me, find yourself beating yourself up when things aren’t as easy as you felt they should have been. Maybe you are your own worst enemy. I know I am.

My pastor mentioned recently that most people think the Promised Land is a symbol of Heaven. But he clarified: it’s not a symbol of Heaven, it’s a symbol of the Blessed Life. There are still enemies in the Promised Land. There are no enemies in Heaven.

What does that have to do with the price of eggs?

Well, for me, it made something click.

The Blessed Life is not a life devoid of problems, devoid of attacks, devoid of enemies, devoid of THE enemy. The Blessed Life is the life that knows, believes, serves, trusts, and walks side by side the One who has already defeated the enemy.

Sweet.

I think, especially in American culture, we get this idea that we’re not supposed to face hardships. We live in a mindset that we’re not supposed to get sick, we’re not supposed to fail, we’re not supposed to face difficulties, and that if we face any of those things, we need find a way to eliminate them as soon as possible.

But when you read the Word you find out very quickly that it’s hardships, trials, difficulties, attacks, and more that bring us to an understanding of our need for redemption. So maybe instead of looking at our life as a series of bumps in the road that should never have been there, perhaps we could start looking at our experiences as opportunities to get to know the character, heart, and love of God the Father a little better. Perhaps we, like James, could take to heart this notion:

Dear brothers and sisters,  when troubles of any kind come your way, consider it an opportunity for great joy.  For you know that when your faith is tested, your endurance has a chance to grow.  So let it grow, for when your endurance is fully developed, you will be perfect and complete, needing nothing. ~James 1:2-4

Think about David and Saul. Saul was DEAD SET against letting David fulfill his destiny. He was absolutely terrified that someone like David should become king and he was bound and determined to keep that from happening. It drove him mad. He chased David around like a lion hunts a gazelle. David had to go into hiding to keep Saul from killing him. David was on the run.

At any point, David could have stopped Saul in his tracks, killed him on the spot, and justified his actions as self defense. He probably would have gotten away with it, too. But he didn’t. He remained humble. He decided to trust God and not take matters into his own hands. And in the end, Saul killed himself as a coward. His obsession against David drove him to madness. And David rose to his destiny without ever having to fix the Saul problem.

Maybe we could take a lesson from David. Maybe instead of trying to eliminate problems from our lives constantly we could instead recognize the merit in learning a little patience, a little endurance, a little long-suffering. Maybe we could use difficulties as a chance to get to know what God is trying to do instead of trying to keep our lives problem-free.

I’m not saying we shouldn’t take medicine when we’re sick or ask forgiveness from our family or friends that we’ve wronged. Certainly problems come with a level of responsibility on our part. But maybe it’s time we entertain the notion that the responsibility is not to fix the problem, but to do our part to live in right-standing with God, seek His face and counsel in all things, and trust Him to take care of the rest.

I think we all know that even when we do try to “fix” things, we rarely succeed. Maybe it’s a sign to stop trying. Maybe it’s time to stop trying to dodge bullets and instead put on the full armor of God. Maybe it’s time we stop asking God to keep things from happening to us and instead ask God to show us what we are supposed to learn from our difficulties.

And maybe, just maybe, we can learn to live by faith, not by attempted difficulty prevention.

A final word: Be strong in the Lord and in his mighty power. Put on all of God’s armor so that you will be able to stand firm against all strategies of the devil. For we are not fighting against flesh-and-blood enemies, but against evil rulers and authorities of the unseen world, against mighty powers in this dark world, and against evil spirits in the heavenly places. Therefore, put on every piece of God’s armor so you will be able to resist the enemy in the time of evil. Then after the battle you will still be standing firm. Stand your ground, putting on the belt of truth and the body armor of God’s righteousness. For shoes, put on the peace that comes from the Good News so that you will be fully prepared. In addition to all of these, hold up the shield of faith to stop the fiery arrows of the devil. Put on salvation as your helmet, and take the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God. Pray in the Spirit at all times and on every occasion. Stay alert and be persistent in your prayers for all believers everywhere. ~Ephesians 6:10-18

Oh man, I LOVE that passage.

boldhumility-01

Bold humility. Humble boldness. No matter how you word it, those two words don’t go together. They are counter-intuitive. One should cancel out the other.

To the world, that is.

But I’ve learned something pretty profound about God as I’ve walked with Him – He’s all about surprising us with opposite, counter-intuitive, seemingly impossible thinking.

When we say, “Stay. It’s not going to work,” He says, “Go. I’ve got this.”

When we think it’s crazy, He says it’s His plan.

When the world says, “Your life has to look a certain way,” God says, “Let me show you what real life (joy, peace, grace) looks like.”

I’ve learned this in little lessons all along the way, but never so big or so profound as I have lately. God is trying to get my attention. Scratch that. God IS getting my attention. He has been showing me that following Him, TRULY following Him, means laying aside droves of preconceived notions, false identities, and failed theories. It means having both boldness and humility at the same time. No, not boldness to trust myself – boldness to trust Him. And humility to know that He is worth trusting.

That’s what I’m learning right now. If faith is really going to be faith, it is going to require action – crazy action. It’s going to require defying pre-defined parameters the world has set for us. It’s going to mean getting kicked around by nay-sayers now and then. It’s going to mean questioning yourself. A LOT.

But I’m learning too that faith, following God blindly, at all costs, also means freedom! It also means joy! It also means reckless abandon! It means being liberated from fear. Fear of ourselves, fear of others, fear of failure, fear of fitting in. It means trusting, no KNOWING that God is who He says He is and everything else is just minutiae. It’s fun! I’m learning to love watching the reactions of those around me when I tell them about my life as of late. Some look at me with a blank stare. Others are quick to say, “Oh that’s great, yeah,” in a feeble attempt to hide their discomfort. Others stop and ponder, poising themselves to offer advice. Some of the advice is worth taking. Other advice goes right into the round file…

Whatever the case, I know this one thing for certain: I’m not trusting me anymore, I’m trusting God. I’m going to approach the throne of grace with a smile on my face and say, “God, whatever you want. Lead me. I’m yours.”

Not because I want to prove anything to anyone. Not because I want to fit into a Christian crowd of elites. Not because I think I’m better for doing so. No – because I know that on my own, I’ve tried and failed over and over again. On my own I’ve made up solution after solution for problem after problem – and they have each failed miserably. On my own, I’ve done nothing but make things worse. But with Him, all things are possible. With Him, I can see light again. With Him, I can rest, trust, breathe, for goodness sake!

So I’ll be bold. Bold to trust this God I claim to serve. And humble to kneel at His feet and say that He and He alone is the author and perfecter of my faith.

Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a huge crowd of witnesses to the life of faith, let us strip off every weight that slows us down, especially the sin that so easily trips us up. And let us run with endurance the race God has set before us. We do this by keeping our eyes on Jesus, the champion who initiates and perfects our faith. Because of the joy awaiting him, he endured the cross, disregarding its shame. Now he is seated in the place of honor beside God’s throne. Think of all the hostility he endured from sinful people; then you won’t become weary and give up. After all, you have not yet given your lives in your struggle against sin. And have you forgotten the encouraging words God spoke to you as his children? He said, “My child, don’t make light of the lord ’s discipline, and don’t give up when he corrects you. For the lord disciplines those he loves, and he punishes each one he accepts as his child.” As you endure this divine discipline, remember that God is treating you as his own children. Who ever heard of a child who is never disciplined by its father? If God doesn’t discipline you as he does all of his children, it means that you are illegitimate and are not really his children at all. Since we respected our earthly fathers who disciplined us, shouldn’t we submit even more to the discipline of the Father of our spirits, and live forever? For our earthly fathers disciplined us for a few years, doing the best they knew how. But God’s discipline is always good for us, so that we might share in his holiness. No discipline is enjoyable while it is happening—it’s painful! But afterward there will be a peaceful harvest of right living for those who are trained in this way. So take a new grip with your tired hands and strengthen your weak knees. Mark out a straight path for your feet so that those who are weak and lame will not fall but become strong.
Hebrews 12:1-13

wedding_stacy

Above: Stacy (left) with her beautiful daughter (right) with my husband on our wedding day

It was five years ago today. We lost a friend that was one of the most selfless, kind, truly honest persons I’ve ever met. Her name was Stacy. She was a wife, a mother, a friend, a lover of Jesus. And to me, she was a rock. I miss her every time I have a funny story to tell. I think of her every time I pass by the places we frequented together. I miss her every time something happens in my life – my children she never met, the crises of faith that I would have shared with her. You see, Stacy was one of those people that would tell you like it is and somehow make you feel better in the process. She had a way about her that was one of a kind, and she was truly my best friend.

I learned at her funeral that I was one of many, many who felt this way about her. And that’s why I know that this song will encourage anyone who knew her. But it is also meant to encourage anyone who has lost someone or something they weren’t supposed to. You see, sometimes life throws us a curve ball. But a blessed life is not a life void of problems, or trials, or losses. It is a life that faces whatever comes with faith in the God who makes all things new, brings hope to all loss, and life to dead places. A blessed life is a life that just keeps believing, somehow.

So on this, the five-year anniversary of the loss of a dear friend to so very many, I would like to share the song I wrote for her the day she passed. Let it encourage you, lift you up, and remind you that life is precious.

We miss you, Stacy.

Song

Somehow (mp3)
To listen, click the link.
PC: To save, right-click the link and click “save linked file as…”
MAC: To save, Option + Click the link

Devotional

Somehow (PDF)
To view, click the link.
PC: To save, right-click the link and click “save linked file as…”
MAC: To save, Option + Click the link

dangerousbiblegames
It has been fascinating reading the comments you are writing on the posts I’ve made about Phil Robertson and the Duck Dynasty debacle. I love reading all the different perspectives, yes, even the ones I don’t agree with. But I have seen a recurring theme among many of the comments as well as other articles I am reading, whether they are from Christians or non-Christians – and it’s a problem that needs to be addressed.

We play dangerous games when it comes to Christianity. In my view, there are two main games we play that are both destructive and damning. One: we add things to the Bible. Two: we take things away from the Bible.

Whether by falling into one category or both, when we decide to pervert the Bible with our own interpretations, however well-meaning, we are playing with eternal Hell-fire, no pun intended.

What am I talking about, exactly? Let’s break this down.

The Danger of Addition

We’ll start with the category of adding things to the Bible. There are lots of religions out there (of which I will not name here for the simple reason that I don’t have time to list them all) that add things to the Bible. They claim things like, “yes, the Bible is true. So is this (insert random religious text or philosophy here).” Their extra-biblical documents serve as “clarification” for the things of the Bible that are difficult to describe or understand on their own. They are authored by men (as is every book in history except the Bible) and often contemporary writings (by contemporary I mean from the last few centuries). It is from these groups that most of the world’s cults appear. However, you don’t have to be of a cult to add things to the Bible and claim them to be true.

The danger in adding anything to the Bible is that you suddenly blur the lines of Truth. When do you stop? If there are truths that “pair well” with the Bible based on your own opinion, why don’t other “truths” pair with the Bible in my opinion? Why is your opinion higher than mine? Let’s say you’re a scholar. Does that make your opinion higher than mine? Let’s say you’re a very devout, religious person. Does that make your opinion higher than mine? Or higher than someone else’s? Where does it stop? And who’s to say who is right?

The thing about God is that, well, He is GOD. He gets to decide what Truth is. Not me. Not you. Not anyone well “learned” in any specific subject. Because if Truth is up to humans, then there is no such thing as Truth for it is subjective to passing whims, trends, and ideas over the millennia. Truth is either infallible, or it isn’t truth. Therefore ANYTHING outside of the Bible that is paraded as “just as true” as the Bible, is indeed NOT.

The Danger of Subtraction

The other category is of those who would take things away from the Bible. These are the folks who would say that we don’t really know what certain passages mean, or that certain passages are just metaphorical, or that much of the Bible is just folk stories that didn’t really happen. The danger here is similar to the danger of adding things to the Bible. Who am I to say what’s true and what’s not? Sure, I’m a person of intellect. I can read the book of Jonah and come to the conclusion that it seems highly improbable that a man was swallowed by a fish and lived to tell the tale. But who am I to say that it DIDN’T happen either? I wasn’t there. Neither were you. And why couldn’t it have happened? After all, if the God who CREATED THE UNIVERSE wanted me to hang out in the belly of a giant fish for a while to learn my lesson, I’m pretty sure He could get me out alive, too.

Aside from the fact that using the Huffington Post as your authority on the Bible makes about as much sense as using a high school student’s 300 word paper on rocket science as your authority on the science, I decided to click and read.

The danger in cherry-picking what’s true in the Bible is that you fall down a slippery slope where the Bible means one thing to this group and another to that group. The Bible stops being absolute Truth and starts being an ancient self help book that is about as trustworthy to stand on for your life’s problems as Swiss cheese.

Here’s case and point. I read something the other day by a well-meaning friend who was pointing out that we don’t “really know what the Bible means when it talks about [subject intentionally removed†].” This person then provided a link to a Huffington Post article entitled, “What Does the Bible Really Say About [subject intentionally removed]?” Aside from the fact that using the Huffington Post as your authority on the Bible makes about as much sense as using a high school student’s 300 word paper on rocket science as your authority on the science, I decided to click and read. The article cited all of the scriptures on the subject, both Old and New Testament, most of which say things blatant like “IT IS AN ABOMINATION.” Their conclusion? Well, we don’t know if that’s what they REALLY meant.

Really? This is your earth-shattering conclusion about a difficult topic in the Bible? We don’t REALLY know what they meant?

I don’t know about you, but I would not want to bet my eternity on a twenty-first century’s online editorial about the possible nuances of Biblical sentence structure. Seems like a losing proposition.

The Bible, The Whole Bible, and Nothing But the Bible

As for me, I don’t have time to wonder what’s true and what’s not in the Bible. It’s either ALL TRUE, or ALL CRAZY. That’s really the only scenario that makes sense to me. And I don’t want to hear the argument that it’s all in “how you interpret it.” There is no difficulty in interpreting, “[Insert Biblically-cited sin] is an abomination.”

It would seem to me that the only reason to pick and choose what is true in the Bible is to justify our own sins. And it may even be as simple as just choosing to ignore certain parts of the Bible as opposed to redefining them. I know several pastors who were in the depths of an affair still preaching the Word. Did they say that the Bible doesn’t say adultery is sin? Oh no, they instead justified their actions by saying that they were really in love with their mistresses, but not with their wives.

So that makes it all ok, right?

Wrong. I’m not going to pretend to be intellectually on-par with a being who created the universe and orchestrated divine intricacies like photosynthesis and the miracle of conception by saying I know when He was just being metaphorical. Or ironic. Or sentimental. I’m going to play it safe (smart, rather) and assume He meant every word He said. Either that or I’m going to assume He meant none of it. Otherwise, I’m not doing myself or anyone else any favors by claiming to have correctly interpreted the subtle and subversive nuances of the Almighty God. I’ll leave that up to Him.

†If you’re wondering why I removed the subject of discussion, I wanted to make sure this post sticks to the intended purpose: a discussion of Biblical interpretation. I did not want to chase rabbits of the nuances of specific topics of the Bible. (At least not on this post.)

iblamegod
I fear we need to gain a little perspective on the subject of Phil Robertson vs. the entire homosexual community. I’ve heard a lot of people clarify their stance on the subject with phrases along the lines of, “it’s not what he said, it’s how he said it.”

Perhaps we need to have a little reality check. Phil Robertson is an uncouth, backwoods redneck (self-proclaimed). His beard is longer than my hair. His idea of comfortable clothes includes camouflage pants and a camouflage shirt. His idea of Sunday fancies includes camouflage pants and a black shirt. His idea of interior design includes a camouflage recliner to match his camouflage pants. If we were all expecting eloquent prose from the man, then perhaps we all need a gentle little “love slap” in our proverbial faces. Admittedly, his comments were uncouth and graphic. But his comments were also a paraphrasing of the Bible. So let’s all get honest here. We can hide behind the excuse of not liking how he said what he said, but reality is obviously that we just didn’t like what he said.

It has been God’s M.O. from day one to use the unexpected messenger.

And unfortunately, if you don’t like what he said, then you don’t like the Bible. That’s something you need to take up with God Almighty, not Phil Robertson. Or A&E. Or the whole of Christendom.

Yes, Phil Robertson is rough around the edges, to put it nicely. But if I don’t like that style, I don’t have to listen. I don’t have to watch. No one is forcing me to turn on A&E on Wednesday nights with my head in a vice turned towards the television, forcing the crudeness of Duck Dynasty into my sweet, innocent head. I can go watch Here Comes Honey Boo Boo just as easily, and feel great about my much more sensible cable television choice.

But if you think that God can’t use someone like Phil because he’s uncouth and outlandish, you’re sadly mistaken. It has been God’s M.O. from day one to use the unexpected messenger. I don’t have the time to list out all of them (read the Bible for all the details), but I’ll use the example of John the Baptist, for the sake of this argument. (It is Christmastime, after all. And John’s mission was to herald the coming of the Promised One.)

John the Baptist. If you don’t know much about him, you probably at least know that he was dirty. And kind of gross. And lived in the desert eating locusts and honey. He was loud and kind of obnoxious in the face of the status quo. He probably, for all intents and purposes, looked and acted a LOT like Phil Robertson. (Consequently, Phil himself pointed out in his I Am Second† video that he doesn’t look nearly as rough as John the Baptist did. Funny, really.) But God used him nonetheless as a powerful herald to the world of that time that the Kingdom of Heaven was near! His message shook the world from the ground up, so much so, that the king himself (Herod) had him beheaded just to shut him up. (Oh the irony, A&E! Oh the irony!)

If God chose a vagabond like John the Baptist to herald the coming of His Son (you know, the Messiah, SAVIOR OF THE ENTIRE WORLD), why wouldn’t God use Phil Robertson to remind the world that we need him? He uses all kinds of people to spread His message. We are all different, after all. And different styles speak to different people. If you want a squeaky clean, feel good Gospel, tune into Joel Osteen. If you want a passionate, challenging Gospel, tune into T. D. Jakes. If you want a meaty and deep combing through of the Gospel, tune into Robert Morris. If you want a down-to-earth, rough around the edges version of the Gospel, tune into Phil Robertson. God’s in the business of being all things to all people, after all. He meets us where we are; He doesn’t expect us to become something we’re not in order to meet Him.

No, it’s not really Phil the world has a problem with these days. It’s his message. And his message is the Bible. So let’s all stop beating around the bush and be honest – people don’t like to hear that their way of life is a sin. People don’t like to hear that there is only ONE WAY to Heaven through Jesus Christ. People don’t like to hear that “good people” don’t get into heaven. People don’t like to hear that things are an abomination in God’s eyes. People don’t like to hear anything these days that might challenge their comfortable little zone of the world.

No, my friends, it’s not Phil Roberson you have a problem with. It’s God.

Take it up with Him. He can take it, let me assure you. And He would absolutely love to have the conversation with you.

†As an inconsequential side note, it was this I Am Second video that got me started watching Duck Dynasty. Before I saw it, I didn’t have a care in the world to watch the show because I’m not really into uncouth, pointless reality television. Just like you, I have a choice NOT to watch. But once I saw this video, I knew I wanted to know more about this family that would stand so boldly for faith on an otherwise grossly secular network. And God bless them for it!

bibleisforbigots
Wow, the web seems to have blown up in the last 24 hours over the whole A&E Networks vs. Phil Robertson debacle! It seems everyone has a distinct and polarizing opinion on the subject. In case you’re unaware entirely, Phil Robertson, the father of the family starring in the A&E show Duck Dynasty, said (in a nutshell) in an interview with GQ magazine that he believes homosexuality is wrong because the Bible teaches that it’s wrong. And what a hullabaloo that created! People are shouting from their virtual mountain tops on either side of the debate.

“Christians are haters!”

“Stand with Phil!”

“Ban Duck Dynasty because the Robertsons are bigots!”

“Ban A&E for banning Phil!”

Wherever you stand, one thing is clear: the subject of homosexuality in America is touchy, to say the least.

The Bible also teaches other, very clear principles: things like “love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:31) and “remove the plank from your own eye before you remove the speck from your brother’s” (Matthew 7:5).

But all of this racket has got me thinking. I have many, many homosexual friends. I have steered clear of the topic on this blog until now because I would never, EVER want them to feel hurt by something I might say in the heat of the moment. To be clear, I do believe the Bible’s stand is clear on the subject: it is wrong and a sin. But the Bible also teaches other, very clear principles: things like “love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:31) and “remove the plank from your own eye before you remove the speck from your brother’s” (Matthew 7:5). All this to say that if you are one of those Christians who claims to believe the whole Bible, then it would behoove you to apply the whole Bible. And what that means, in a very tiny nutshell, is that while sin is sin, the Love of Christ trumps it. And our calling as believers is to stand with truth, preach the Gospel, and LOVE our brothers, our neighbors, our enemies alike, just as Christ loves us.

If we’re incapable of doing both, then we shouldn’t call ourselves followers of Christ.

If we’re going to follow that line of thinking, we would all hate all people, all the time, for no one is perfect, no not one.

But I would daresay that the problem actually lies in a giant, societal assumption about most things Christian these days. There is an underlying message that if you believe something contrary to me, you must hate me. Look around and see if it isn’t so. And unfortunately homosexuality falls square in the middle of that line of thinking.

I would like to propose the idea that we, as humans, are perfectly capable of believing in certain principles and laws of God without hating those who don’t follow them. After all, the Bible also says that “all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:23). So if we’re going to follow that line of thinking, we would all hate all people, all the time, for no one is perfect, no not one.

I’ll give a simple example. The Bible teaches to “honor your father and mother.” This is both an Old and New Testament principle (Exodus and Ephesians). My children, God bless them, have yet to master the art of honoring me and my husband perfectly all the time. Despite their sweet little faces, they can be real pistols from time to time. And while they fail at this clearly-stated Biblical principle, I don’t fail to love them for it. I haven’t decided to hate my children because they haven’t repented of their sins of dishonor. No, it’s quite the contrary. I love them all the more, because I know that love is the only thing that’s going to teach them that following said principle is even worth it.

And, my friends, the same applies to homosexuality. Do I agree with it? No, I don’t. There, I said it. But do I hate anyone who practices it? Absolutely not!! Absolutely not. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. I love them dearly, because I know that they, just like me, are sinners in need of a Savior. And I don’t ever want any hate I might spew to ever deter them from finding that Truth.

When I read the words of Phil Robertson (all of them, not just the snippets that are being thrown around social media like a hot potato), I don’t see a bit of hate in them. I see a man who, when asked, shared that he agrees with the Bible on the subject of homosexuality. But he went on to say that, “I would never treat anyone with disrespect just because they are different from me. We are all created by the Almighty and like Him, I love all of humanity. We would all be better off if we loved God and loved each other.”

Does that sound like a man of hate? Indeed, it doesn’t. And perhaps we would all be better off if we remembered that just because you believe certain things about the world, about life, about your faith, it does not in any way imply that you hate anyone who doesn’t share those beliefs.

There is a growing intolerance for anything Christian these days. And we Christians would do well to remember that, remain calm, and show love anyway. Otherwise, we will just be joining the squeaky wheels in a useless cycle of name-calling and tantrums. And it won’t get us anywhere.

The majority of the world is a bunch of crazies that need to be locked up.

So what does all of this have to do with Christmas? Everything, actually. The message of Christmas is that God loved us so much that He didn’t want to leave us the way we are. He saw in us something worth saving, worth loving, worthy dying for. So He sent His only son to earth that whoever would believe in Him, would have everlasting life with Him. Wow. Have you ever really thought about that? God. Sent His Son. To DIE. For YOU. So that you don’t have to stay how you are. You can have LIFE in Him. A life everlasting. Whatever our sins are, they are already forgiven by Christ. All we have to do is accept that. If we’ve all sinned, then we all need Christ. So it’s a good thing He came, isn’t it?

I love Christmas because I love Christ. And because I love Christ, I love everyone He loves. I may not like them all the time, but I love them nonetheless. And I’m determined to let everyone know who would listen, that Christ is everything we would ever need, if only we would let Him be. Does that make me an intolerant bigot? If I am, then so is Christ. And if Christ is, then millions, nay billions of those who have followed Him over the millennia were too. And if that’s the case, the majority of the world is a bunch of crazies that need to be locked up. And if that’s the way you feel, you DEFINITELY need Christ this Christmas! 🙂

Let’s all take a moment to remember what Christ did for us, and what we can do for each other in return. And let’s all calm down and stop crucifying anyone who might believe that, stand for it, and apply all that the God of the Bible teaches. Love bears all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never fails, after all. (I Corinthians 13:7-8)